AR-480 / 4 credits

Teacher: Huang Jeffrey

Language: English

Withdrawal: It is not allowed to withdraw from this subject after the registration deadline.

Remark: Inscription faite par la section


Summary

Experience Design examines the effects of digitalization on architectural typologies in the contemporary city. The course questions traditional typologies by focusing on an understanding and re-design of social, geographic, temporal and emotional experiences.

Content

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, the student must be able to:

  • Identify issues of experience design in relation to an actual typology.
  • Perform rigorous analysis of the problem space and map the stakeholders, spatial flows, temporal journeys, and touch points involved in the experience.
  • Develop alternative design concepts for future experiences.
  • Translate experience concepts into meaningful architectures through iterative prototyping at appropriate scales and levels of granularity.
  • Create convincing arguments and visual evidence for the design propositions.

Transversal skills

  • Collect data.
  • Design and present a poster.
  • Set objectives and design an action plan to reach those objectives.
  • Make an oral presentation.

Teaching methods

Presentations, Mapping exercises, Hands-on design activities, Design reviews, Group projects.

 

Expected student activities

Group discussion, Case studies, Mapping, Sketching, Designing, Design Reviews, Pin-Up, Desk Crits.

 

Supervision

Office hours Yes
Assistants Yes

Resources

Bibliography

Huang, J., Future Space: A New Blueprint for Business Architecture, Harvard Business Review (April 2001): 149-157.

Pine, J. and Gilmore, J. (1999) The Experience Economy, Harvard Business School Press, Boston, 1999.

Cziksentmihalyi, M. (1990). Flow: The Psychology of optimal experience. New York: Happer and Row.

Dewey, J. (1934). Art as experience. New York: Perigee.

Diller, S., Shedroff, N., & Rhea, D. (2006). Making meaning: How successful businesses deliver meaningful experiences. CA: New Riders.

Sergei Eisenstein, The Film Sense, translated and edited by Jay Leyda, Faber and Faber, London, 1943 (1986 edition).

Hutchinson-Guest, Ann. (1989). Choreo-Graphics; A Comparison of Dance Notation Systems from the Fifteenth Century to the Present. New York: Gordon and Breach.

Lev Kuleshov, Kuleshov on Film, translated and edited by Ro- bert Levaco, University of California Press, Berkeley, California, 1974, pp. 49-50.

Laban, Rudoph. (1928). Schrifttanz. Wein: Universal.

Norman, D. A. (1988). The design of everyday things. New York: Double Day Dell.

Shedroff, N. (2001). Experience design. Indiana: New Riders.

Shostack, G. Lynn. "Designing Services that Deliver", Harvard Business Review, vol. 62, no. 1 January - February 1984, pp 133-139.

Tschumi, Bernard. The Manhattan Transcripts. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1981.

Tufte, Edward R (2001) [1983], The Visual Display of Quantitative Information (2nd ed.), Cheshire, CT: Graphics Press.

 

Ressources en bibliothèque

In the programs

  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: During the semester (winter session)
  • Subject examined: UE X : Experience design
  • Lecture: 3 Hour(s) per week x 12 weeks
  • Exercises: 1 Hour(s) per week x 12 weeks
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: During the semester (winter session)
  • Subject examined: UE X : Experience design
  • Lecture: 3 Hour(s) per week x 12 weeks
  • Exercises: 1 Hour(s) per week x 12 weeks
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: During the semester (winter session)
  • Subject examined: UE X : Experience design
  • Lecture: 3 Hour(s) per week x 12 weeks
  • Exercises: 1 Hour(s) per week x 12 weeks

Reference week

 MoTuWeThFr
8-9     
9-10     
10-11     
11-12     
12-13     
13-14    DIA005
14-15    
15-16    
16-17    DIA005
17-18    
18-19     
19-20     
20-21     
21-22     

Friday, 13h - 16h: Lecture DIA005

Friday, 16h - 18h: Exercise, TP DIA005