PHYS-461 / 4 credits

Teacher: Rochman Dimitri

Language: English


Summary

This course will present an overview of the nuclear interactions for neutrons on nuclei below a few hundreds of MeV. The aspect of so-called "nuclear data" will be presented from the perspective of experiments, compilation, calculation, evaluation, processing and applications.

Content

The following subjects will be presented:

  • Nuclear data needs: It is important to understand if, and where, nuclear data are needed, why, which accuracy is required from the applications or industries. Such needs concerns a large range of applications: energy, medical, waste and astrophysics. Each of these fields requires different knowledge on nuclear interactions with, either with neutrons, or protons, or both.
  • Theoretical background: Many of the needs are covered by experimental knowledge, but not all. Some reactions cannot be easily measured, or are simply out of range with current technologies (for instance for with short-lived isotopes). What can we do in this case ? Part of the answer relies on theoretical understanding and the prediction power of current models (with their shortcoming). We will then explore (not in details) some of the important models, their range of applications, and what to do when nothing is known.
  • Measurement facilities: The current knowledge of nuclear interactions, cross sections and uncertainties is based on measurements. In many instances, measurements are necessary due to the lack of prediction power for models. We will see the existing facilities, their advantages and drawback. We will also visit the installation worldwide, with a view on the future needs.
  • Evaluation: Once quantities have been measured or calculated, they need to be presented to potential users. This step is called "evaluation". The outcome of the process is "what the users will see". It covers compiling measurements, combining them with theoretical predictions, formatting, and processing in forms that users need. We will go through these steps, and you will globally understand the importance of these steps.
  • Applications: finally, we will see how these nuclear data are used. What are the applications, what are the needs, and how users can propose feedback to influence new measurements, or new calculations.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, the student must be able to:

  • Use applications codes

Assessment methods

written exam

In the programs

  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: Written (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Nuclear interaction : from reactors to stars
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Type: optional
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: Written (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Nuclear interaction : from reactors to stars
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Type: optional
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: Written (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Nuclear interaction : from reactors to stars
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Type: optional
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: Written (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Nuclear interaction : from reactors to stars
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Type: optional
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: Written (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Nuclear interaction : from reactors to stars
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Type: optional

Reference week

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