ME-480 / 3 credits

Teacher(s): Sakar Mahmut Selman, Persat Alexandre Louis André

Language: English

Withdrawal: It is not allowed to withdraw from this subject after the registration deadline.


Summary

The objective of this course is to expose students to the fundamentals of mechanobiology. We will highlight the technologies that enable the study of living systems including mechanical manipulation and characterization, along with computational modeling frameworks.

Content

Keywords

mechanosensing, mechanotransduction, physics of living systems, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, bioinstrumentation, quantitative microscopy, microtechnology, robotic biomanipulation.

 

Learning Prerequisites

Recommended courses

Biomaterials (BIOENG-442)

Physics of Cells (BIO-244)

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, the student must be able to:

  • Propose mechanical tests for the characterization of biological tissues and fluids, B6
  • Describe the feedback loop that, starting from a mechanical signal translated into a chemical signal, allows for the adaptation of the mechanical properties of tissues, B9
  • Develop physical models of living systems
  • Synthesize learned engineering skills to create novel solutions, CP14
  • Specify the role of mechanics in a particular physiological or pathological process

Transversal skills

  • Make an oral presentation.
  • Summarize an article or a technical report.
  • Write a scientific or technical report.
  • Access and evaluate appropriate sources of information.
  • Evaluate one's own performance in the team, receive and respond appropriately to feedback.

Teaching methods

  • Ex cathedra
  • Interactive presentations of case studies by graduate students
  • Exercises
  • Student Presentations

Expected student activities

  • Active participation
  • Reading background literature
  • Critical evaluation of technical articles and group presentations
  • Writing a report

Assessment methods

  • Literature Review Report (25%)
  • Assignments (25%)
  • Final Project (50%)

Supervision

Office hours No
Assistants Yes
Forum Yes

Resources

Bibliography

  • Physical Biology of the Cell, by Rob Philipps and collegaues. Garland Science (2nd edition).
  • Mechanisms of Morphogenesis, by Jamie A. Davies. Academic Press (2nd edition).
  • Biological Physics of the Developing Embryo by Gabor Forgacs and Stuart A. Newman. Cambridge University Press.

In the programs

  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: During the semester (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Mechanobiology: how mechanics regulate life
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 1 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: During the semester (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Mechanobiology: how mechanics regulate life
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 1 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: During the semester (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Mechanobiology: how mechanics regulate life
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 1 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: During the semester (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Mechanobiology: how mechanics regulate life
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 1 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: During the semester (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Mechanobiology: how mechanics regulate life
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Exercises: 1 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks

Reference week

 MoTuWeThFr
8-9     
9-10     
10-11     
11-12     
12-13     
13-14     
14-15  CE1106  
15-16    
16-17  CE1106  
17-18     
18-19     
19-20     
20-21     
21-22     

Wednesday, 14h - 16h: Lecture CE1106

Wednesday, 16h - 17h: Exercise, TP CE1106