ENV-512 / 4 credits

Teacher(s): Battin Tom Ian, Robison Andrew Lean

Language: English


Summary

Understand the functioning of rivers, focusing on hydrological, geomorphologic, biogeochemical and ecological components, and their linkages. Analyze impacts of global change on rivers ecosystems, develop skills related to synthesizing and interpreting literature and communicating science.

Content

Keywords

global change, climate change, stream and river ecosystems, hydrology, geomorphology, biogeochemistry, ecology

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, the student must be able to:

  • Analyze impacts of climate change on river structures and processes.
  • Assess / Evaluate mitigation strategies.
  • Formulate

Teaching methods

Your grade in this course will be based upon three endeavors: written reviews of scientific literature, presentations on topics within the fluvial sciences, and a final exam. The description of each endeavor and the grading of each are described here. Rubrics which describe the grading the assignments are available on the course website.

 

Expected student activities

Students will read, rpesent and discuss papers. They will write mini-reviews and present science.

Assessment methods

1. Reviews: Understanding and interpreting scientific literature is a critical skill of any scientist, as the progress of science is built on the foundations of previous research. From reading papers one can learn about the underlying science, the methods used, and ongoing questions within the science.  In this course, you will submit three reviews of scientific literature on various topics, two 2-page reviews and one 4-page review. These will require incorporating literature provided by the instructors with additional sources online (e.g., GoogleScholar). Some instruction on how to write these reviews will be provided in class, and additional resources will be provided on Moodle. In general, grading will assess the extent to which the student understands the material and can summarize the key ideas.

  1. Presentations

Communication of science is another valuable skill for any professional. Effective communication requires a deep understanding of the material and a committed effort to explain the material to the target audience. In this course, you will give two 10-minute presentations as a small group. The first will cover a predetermined topic, while the second presentation will be on a topic of your choice pending instructor approval. Presentations should utilize the scientific literature, particularly through the use of figures and images preferentially over text. In general, grading will assess the clarity of the main idea presented, how well that message is supported in the presentation, and slide design.

  1. Final exam

The final exam will contain material from the entire course, including lectures, readings, and student presentations. The exam will primarily be essay based.

Grading:

Mini-review 1: 5%

Mini-review 2: 5%

Final review: 20%

First presentation: 10%

Second presentation: 20%

Final exam: 40%

In the programs

  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: Written (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Global change ecology and fluvial ecosystems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Practical work: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Fall
  • Exam form: Written (winter session)
  • Subject examined: Global change ecology and fluvial ecosystems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Practical work: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks

Reference week

 MoTuWeThFr
8-9     
9-10     
10-11     
11-12     
12-13  CM013  
13-14    
14-15  CM013  
15-16    
16-17     
17-18     
18-19     
19-20     
20-21     
21-22     

Wednesday, 12h - 14h: Lecture CM013

Wednesday, 14h - 16h: Exercise, TP CM013