ME-498 / 5 credits

Teacher: Kaboli Amin

Language: English

Withdrawal: It is not allowed to withdraw from this subject after the registration deadline.


Summary

Continuous Improvement encompasses the ongoing effort to capture, create, and deliver value to internal and external customers. This course equips students with practical skills and tools to improve products/services/processes with the support of technology and empowering people.

Content

Keywords

Continuous improvement, Value Chain, Product/Service, Process, Technology, People, Operational Excellence, Engineering Leadership.

Learning Prerequisites

Required courses

  • Probability and Statistics

Recommended courses

  • Production Management
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Data Science for Business

Important concepts to start the course

  • Data analysis using Excel
  • Active engagement and teamwork
  • Advanced level of probability and statistics

Objective of this course

  • Understanding how a manufacturing company captures, creates, and adds value for its customers
  • Analyzing the product/service/process of a manufacturing company
  • Developing and driving improvement plans for the product/service/process

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, the student must be able to:

Transversal skills

  • Evaluate one's own performance in the team, receive and respond appropriately to feedback.
  • Write a scientific or technical report.
  • Communicate effectively, being understood, including across different languages and cultures.
  • Negotiate effectively within the group.
  • Set objectives and design an action plan to reach those objectives.
  • Chair a meeting to achieve a particular agenda, maximising participation.
  • Resolve conflicts in ways that are productive for the task and the people concerned.
  • Make an oral presentation.
  • Take account of the social and human dimensions of the engineering profession.
  • Identify the different roles that are involved in well-functioning teams and assume different roles, including leadership roles.
  • Take responsibility for environmental impacts of her/ his actions and decisions.

Teaching methods

  • Formal lectures
  • Case studies
  • Project-based learning
  • Games and simulations
  • Videos
  • Book chapters, hand-outs, and notes
  • Guest speakers

The course is based on the implementation of theoretical concepts and models to practical cases. Students work in a group on multiple cases during the whole semester.

Expected student activities

  • Individual: Self-study, Active class discussions, case evaluations, Q&A
  • In-group: Teamwork (respect, brainstorming, involvement and constructive feedback)
  • Presentation: Share your findings weekly in class/group coaching sessions

Assessment methods

Continuous evaluation of case reports, projects, individual and group presentations, class discussions, during the semester. More precisely:

  • 25% Participation, and class engagement,
  • 45% Class assignments, presentations, projects, and case reports,
  • 30% Final (Final report and presentation and understanding of the case)

Supervision

Office hours Yes
Assistants Yes
Forum Yes

Resources

Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI)

Yes

Bibliography

Series of book chapters, hand-outs, and notes will be shared in the class. The following books are recommended for further reading (and not mandatory);

 

Process:

  1. Stevenson, W. J. (2020). Operations management. McGraw Hill.
  2. Slack, N., Chambers, S., & Johnston, R. (2016). Operations management. Pearson education.
  3. Sterman, J. (2010). Business dynamics. Irwin/McGraw-Hill c2000.
  4. Senge, P. M. (2006). The fifth discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization. Doubleday.
  5. Kotter, J. P. (2012). Leading change. Harvard business press.

 

Technology:

  1. Porter, M. E., & Heppelmann, J. E. (2014). How smart, connected products are transforming competition. Harvard business review92(11), 64-88.
  2. Porter, M. E., & Heppelmann, J. E. (2015). How smart, connected products are transforming companies. Harvard business review93(10), 96-114.
  3. Agrawal, A., Gans, J., & Goldfarb, A. (2018). Prediction machines: the simple economics of artificial intelligence. Harvard Business Press.
  4. Rogers, D. L. (2016). The digital transformation playbook: Rethink your business for the digital age. Columbia University Press.
  5. Gupta, S. (2018). Driving digital strategy: A guide to reimagining your business. Harvard Business Press.Chicago
  6. Iansiti, M., & Lakhani, K. R. (2020). Competing in the age of AI: strategy and leadership when algorithms and networks run the world. Harvard Business Press.

 

People:

  1. Dweck, C., (2007). Mindset: The New Psychology of Success. Ballantine Books
  2. Goleman, D., (2005). Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ. Random House Publishing Group.
  3. Tan, C. M. (2018). Search inside yourself. HarperOne; Reprint edition.
  4. Kahneman, D. (2011). Thinking, fast and slow. Macmillan.
  5. Kahneman, D., Sibony, O., & Sunstein, C. R. (2021). Noise: A flaw in human judgment. Little, Brown.
  6. Kohlrieser, G. (2006). Hostage at the table: How leaders can overcome conflict, influence others, and raise performance(Vol. 145). John Wiley & Sons.
  7. Rosenberg, M. B. (2002). Nonviolent communication: A language of compassion. Encinitas, CA: Puddledancer press.
  8. Stone, D., Patton, B., & Heen, S. (2010). Difficult conversations: How to discuss what matters most. Penguin.

Ressources en bibliothèque

In the programs

  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Semester: Spring
  • Number of places: 50
  • Exam form: During the semester (summer session)
  • Subject examined: Continuous improvement of manufacturing systems
  • Lecture: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks
  • Project: 2 Hour(s) per week x 14 weeks

Reference week

 MoTuWeThFr
8-9     
9-10     
10-11     
11-12     
12-13     
13-14     
14-15     
15-16     
16-17     
17-18     
18-19     
19-20     
20-21     
21-22